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an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing our country. you've likely heard it before. we, the questioners often ask, well, what would reagan do? it's a good question to ask, because while times and technology and many faces have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those that speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today, governor jeb bush, understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remains an extremely important national voice in th
much for stopping by. you've been covering every president since ronald reagan and wissed -- witnessed a lot of these occasions where reporters try to get something from the president. how have these evolved over the years? >> as you referenced. it was almost accidental. wilson thought he was sort -- simply meeting the reporters one by one, but when 100 or more pushed into the oval office, he addressed them. and then there were more that couldn't make it that day, a week later he did it again in the east room. that became the form. the first 60 years or more, there was a back and forth but it was understood that it was off the record unless a president allowed the quote. and truman and eisenhower and f.d.r. could get reporters to alter their quotes if they didn't like what they had said, sort of fix it up. the modern news conference really began with eisenhower, at least the telvized part. question?kes a good i know the answer may depend on o the president is, but what are you looking for and how do you frame your questions? >> you want to ask a -- ask a question straightforward enough
, it is hard to say. host: in april of 1988, president ronald reagan. >> george bush is doing well. george has been a wonderful vice president, but nobody is perfect. i put him in charge of anti-terrorism and the mcglove lynn -- and the mcgloughlin group is still on the air. [laughter] >> but with some -- so much focus on the presidential election, i've been feeling a little lonely these days. i'm so desperate for attention, i am considered holding a news conference. host: was there a private ronald reagan? was he different off camera than on the stage? >> he really wasn't. when you talked to ronald reagan in private, you got sort of the same stories about life in hollywood or california and politics that you often got in public. he was, in fact, a very private man. he was always cordial, always pleasant. host: did he enjoy these conferences? guest: i don't think he particularly did. host: did he look at the history -- if you look at the history, was your sense john kennedy enjoyed these conferences? guest: i believe he did. host: let's go to alex in youngstown, ohio. caller: what is his relat
years of presidential press conferences. commemoratell another anniversary. president ronald reagan and his star wars defense initiative. "washington journal" continues. we are back in a moment. >> we could take pictures of the ans and seemri sc the whole thing. there is an enormous gap about how the surface of the brain function to be able to move my hand or to look at u.n. process the information or to lay down a memory. we do not know how that works. a lot of this will be technology development. a lot of it will be nano- technology. we want to look at london's of thousands of brain cells at the same time to understand -- look at hundreds of thousands of plant cells at the same time. we do not have a scientific plan about milestones. it is getting to be an exciting moment to put something together that we cannot have thought of. nih director on c-span plus some "q & a." ofyou have been out commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since 2009. will we expect some turnover with the commission? >> we all have staggered terms. the past years have flown by quickly. we will see. i
. ronald reagan was president. republicans controlled the senate, not the house, but rage gain has been successful in getting things through the house. immersed a whole bunch evidence to say that there had been, i called it media realignment. that the media was getting more conservative or at least less liberal and i wrote a whole piece on the cover of the new republic. it was completely wrong. as it turned out. i had all of this evidence that i thought added up to something and it really did not. >> does it matter though? >> of course it matter? why? >> look at the bam campaign. >> you never changed your views and you lived around the liberal media? what does it matter? are they all sheep following the media says? >> oh, who? >> others. >> the reporters. well, there have been some who have come out. i remember charles when he was liberal. i remember mike when he was a pollster for a liberal democratic polling firm. so some people have changed. >> i am talking about the public? >> sure. >> the public, does the public see only liberal coverage and say, yeah, that is the way i think? >> y
. when ronald reagan did it we had 7% growth in one year and that is the bold leadership we need but it's not a new principle. we don't have to reinvent ourselves in that way but we have to stand on principle and unless you stand for something people are not motivated to vote for you. >> chris: let's talk about what you stand about, immigration. you came out with your ideas for a comprehensive plan this week and since then you are taking fire from both the right and the left. you call your plan for creating a legal status. not citizenship, but a legal status, for the 11 million folks who are already here, illegal immigrants who are here but taking fire from the right because you oppose the e-verify system which would make it easier for employers to check whether their workers are in fact legal or illegal. why would you oppose that? >> that's not the main part of my plan. the main part is trust but verify, we have to have border security and conservatives always wanted border security before we had immigration reform and the amendment i'll add to the bipartisan plan will ensure that ther
for ronald reagan and for george h.w. bush. so he's really -- he started out as a political consultant. he's certainly a republican. he's certainly a conservative. that's reflected in fox news. i did a quiz with him that a professor at ucla had cooked up to measure conservativism versus liberalism. and he took it and so did i, by the way. and it turns out that he is more conservative than the network. and he agreed that that's probably true. >> so he's obviously very conservative in that position that he has, it filters down, i assume, on the network. i want to play a clip. this is sarah palin. she used to be a fox news contributor until the last election. this is what she said at the conservative political action conference that took place in washington this past weekend. >> if these experts who keep losing elections, yet keep getting rehired, raking in millions, if they feel that strongly about who gets to run in the party, then show should buck up or stay in the truck. buck up and run. the architect can head on back to -- [ cheers ] -- they can head on back to the great lone star state
, appointed by ronald reagan in 1987, but he's the author of the court's two most important gay rights decision. lawrence v. texas, which said that states could no longer ban consensual sodomy among consenting adults and the romer case from colorado. so he is certainly the most likely of the five republicans on the court to join the four democrats, at least on the defense of marriage act case, if not also on the proposition 8 case. there are two same-sex marriage cases to be argued next week. >> so, jimmy, if things don't go your way, if the justices like, you know, i'll just shorthand it, rule against same-sex marriage, rule out its constitutionality, what will you do? >> well, this issue is being talked about in every state. and the tenth amendment leaves marriage and family law to the states. and i think that there will be a state-by-state recognition that gay people should have the opportunity and the ability to get married and that will take just a longer conversation that we're having as a nation. and that's what we'll do. we'll continue to take it state by state and show that ma
's platform, these would not have worked so well. >> ronald reagan faced these challenges because he had to deal with a badly broken budget process that was a product of the 1974 act. one of my responsibilities was to draft the decision for reagan called the dutchess process reform act that would deal with these things. i introduced it. we had over 200 sponsors. we had a bipartisan sponsorship in the senate. as you can see from problems we are experiencing, the process has never changed. if you want to find something that is capable of being completely bipartisan, multi- partisan, it is fixing the budget process and a neutral way, because once you subtract everybody's passionate ideology, it is easier to come to agreement about putting a whole thing in a box and making sure there are priorities. making sure the system has teeth, because the big problem the processlow off and people do. >> we started a few minutes late, so we have time for audience questions. if anybody has a question, please raise your hand. i will ask the same thing of you, that when you stand, identify yourself and if
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9